Constellation

Socratic Elenchus: The Elenchus' Heuristic and Moral Significance

Socratic Elenchus: The Elenchus' Heuristic and Moral Significance

dc.contributor.author Mondero, David
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-03T15:43:11Z
dc.date.available 2019-06-03T15:43:11Z
dc.date.issued 2018-12
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10969/1397
dc.description.abstract The elenchus—the logical refutation through question and answer—is a useful tool in determining competency. Socrates’ use of the elenchus in the Laches effectively exposed the ignorance of his two interlocutors. In the same way, Socrates’ use of the elenchus serves as an effective heuristic device in determining competency for societal roles as seen in Plato’s tripartite government. Furthermore, I demonstrate the use of elenchus as the fundamental building block in cognitive-behavioral therapy. Additionally, the elenchus is especially effective in exposing a form of ignorance which I call fortified ignorance. As I will show, fortified ignorance exemplified by Nicias in the Laches leads to devastating consequences. I argue that fortified ignorance is responsible for the failure of the Sicilian Expedition and Adolf Eichmann’s role in Nazi Germany. Given the consequences of fortified ignorance and the effectiveness of elenchus, it is morally necessary to inquire one’s knowledge through the process of elenchus. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject.other Socrates en_US
dc.subject.other Plato en_US
dc.subject.other philosophy en_US
dc.subject.other ignorance en_US
dc.title Socratic Elenchus: The Elenchus' Heuristic and Moral Significance en_US

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